From My Shelves
05 January 2016
at 1:30
at 1:30
With the New Year comes a renewed determination, not only to catalogue my book collection, but to systematically read my way through at least my Arthurian romances and lady scribblers. Not to make excuses for my chronic over-ambition, but last year's attempt at this project began with a copy of at 1:30, by Isabel Ostrander, purchased more or less at random on the basis of its cover, which may explain, if not excuse, my dilatory progress.
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23 August 2015
The Captive
The Captive
No, that's not a new training method I'm trying with Fasolt. Now that I'm finally trying to buckle down and catalogue my book collection, I'm trying to take some of them down off the shelf and read them as well. I admit, Victoria Holt is not first on that list: her books don't stand the test of time for me as well as Phyllis A. Whitney's and others - although I have pulled out a few for a second try.
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26 June 2015
Had great fun putting together this "Woodstack" as part of the Woodstock/Byrdcliffe Guild's "New Sortings" exhibit. The point is to makes the titles tell a little story, as well as telling people something about your book collection. Mine reads "Cotillion at 1:30. The snare of the hunter white hot. The hidden target the love of Julie Borel, woman without a past." The Legend of the Seventh Virgin isn't really meant as a title, just a cover I really, really like. Now, the question is, if I do this with all the books currently piled on the floor and chairs in the library, do I have to admit I'm out of room in my bookshelves... again?
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17 April 2015
At the suggestion of one of those rare students who actually enjoys reading books (I knew I liked him the minute he showed up at my first class on Arthurian romance holding a copy of Neil Gaiman's Fragile Things), I've returned to Robert Holdstock's Mythago Wood. I mean that more or less literally, since I'm fairly certain I've read it before. Even more oddly - lending a suitable sense of circularity to the experience - I believe I must have read the same edition of the book before, because I remember a similar sense of confusion at the blurb, which reverses the names of Steven and Christian, the two brothers whose rivalry over a woman drives the plot.
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26 January 2015
...a novel appeared that transformed the stuff of Celtic legend into a post-modernist masterpiece that uses myth to comment on the disjunction between the ideals of legend and the realities of mid-twentieth century life. I'm, of course, talking about The Sword in the Stone, which does everything Finnegan's Wake does, but is actually fun to read.
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© - Erica Obey
Photos © - George Baird